ways to write a comic script

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Ways to write a comic script essay on king corn

Ways to write a comic script

When I first got into the business about a decade ago, editors sometimes still did Balloon Guides for letterers, taking the pencils or inks and drawing right on them where they thought the balloons should go. I continue the practice more of out of force of habit. Also, knowing the number of balloons keeps me honest. Twenty balloons counting SFX on a single comics page is too damn many.

Give the art some room to breathe, Talkypants! D Formatting Dialogue: Setting off the dialogue from the panel description is the most important function of any comics script, as it allows the artist, letterer, and everybody else recognize at a glance what is image and what is words on the page. Sounds like a no-brainer, but the less the artist needs to do to set off what she needs to worry about versus what the letterer worries about, the better.

E Indents vs Tabs: Letterers often rant on Twitter with the hatred of a billion exploding suns about scriptwriters who offset their dialogue with tabs instead of indents. My dialogue is indented at about 1. Technically that means the first line is tabbed, but the letterer can just move the cursor to the first letter of the line and not capture that first tab with it.

F Size of Individual Balloons: My first editor at Marvel, the terrific Mark Paniccia, said that no balloon should be longer than three lines indented like so. Anything longer should be broken up into two balloons or even a third. This is more of a rule of thumb than an ironclad edict, nevertheless it is one I recommend all noobs follow. My editor at Platinum Studios, Lee Nordling, told me that more than once in his experience an artist had accidentally not drawn the last few panels of a page because their descriptions were on the next script page and he was only reading the script a page at a time.

To counteract the again, really bad habit of Only Reading the Script One Page At a Time problem, a lot of writers put the number of panels at the top of each script page i. H Parenthetical: These are specific directions to the letterer per letterer. I have several stock ones:.

DOWN — i. The acting is taken care of by the artist and therefore ALL visual description needs to be in the panel directions B above. J Ahhhhh a typo the shame, the shame. Also, my frequent co-writer Greg Pak and I wrote a book called Make Comics Like the Pros that takes you through the comics creation process from idea to scripting to pencilling to printing and marketing.

Or I do post-it sketches and stick those to the script. It slows down the writing process down considerably as I have too much to concentrate on at once. I completely agree, Leigh. Inspiration conversation you have here!

I have never written a script for comics or a graphic novel, though I have written scripts for theater and film a treatment. I use the outline to pace out my chapter and plot out the major points I want to cover Note: this thing is fairly mutable and often changes in the next step. I take each bullet point of the outline as a scene description and write out each scene in the chapter as a part of a whole to be pieced together later.

As I write each individual scene which I often do out of order , I just plot out all the dialogue I want first before I stop to think about visuals or page count. Finally, I begin to think of the visuals. Lesser conversation can be thrown into one panel whereas big reveals or reaction shots are given their own panels. This is also the time to figure out establishing shots. Readers need to know where they are at all times.

In response to signing up for your newsletter, I asked about script writing…and here it is, already. But this really helped! I jot down words I want my stories or chapters to define, like; action, adventure, drama, suspense, comedy, light romance, EPIC, genuine, etc.

You know things like that. I use these words to help me keep constancy unless I want to deviate. I always go back to basics during my free time, so this really helped. The good ones all have a few things in common…. For this reason I wrote a Comics Format guide a few years back.

It covers how to format panel description, various balloon styles, plus a chapter on common typos and mistakes. You may be surprised by how many sample scripts are unreadable…I know I was. Anyway, the PDF is absolutely free.

Anyone who wants it can reach me at: [email protected] Ask for the Comics Format Guide. Kurt Hathaway [email protected]. All your posts are so helpful! Chris and Lora, thank you so much for taking concepts vital to comic production and translating them to stuff I understand. I tend to draw the comic first and then figure out the scrip out after.

Although I like doing things this way and find it more free and organic for me, I have noticed that it does mess with characterization. Usually I just start writing down ideas or story elements in a list, then I expand on those ideas, move stuff around and refine.

I break it down by page and panel plus add in descriptions for myself so I can remember what I was thinking when I go to thumbnail everything. Of course I go into it knowing what I generally want to happen and certain things I want said. Plus the whole thing is disposable enough that if I need to rewrite anything, I just tear away the offending pages and draw again. Maybe disadvantages to doing it this way that I never thought of?

I plan to have a more detailed script and then go into doodling the storyboard. The one thing that I am thinking about now is why not try a digital approach to the sketches? It might be easier to edit. Which would help him control pacing for both sides. I really liked that method and inspired my own method. For my first full story, I wrote an outline for it using the three act structure. Then I would break down everything that happened into index cards and draw the panels on the back.

I would number them and then on sheets of paper I would order them. Then do a storyboard with it. Midway through it I had to change the process. So instead I would take printing paper and split it into nine boxes and do the same thing with that paper that I did with the index cards. The index cards were too small for me to see. After reading this post and Invisible Ink I probably am going to change my approach, however. Then do a storyboard similar to Archie. This way I can make changes to the story much easier as my main problem with sketching it out was it took a lot of trouble to change things since I had to resketch.

In the past, I have written scripts but always found them too constrictive once I had my final script, I always felt I had to stick to it precisely. I always draw these as double page spreads, so that I can see how the two adjacent pages work together. This worked quite well for me overall, and I got a first draft put together which, although crudely drawn, was a fully readable version of the story.

This was the point I was at when I left uni, and after coming home I looked over the first draft again, and filled it with sticky notes detailing changes to the action, dialogue, composition, etc. This meant that I was quite rushed to get the first draft done and ready for my tutors to see.

Sorry, that turned into an essay! During the course of my plotting that is still going on I switched the main characters because the side characters looked more solid and much more interesting. One of the main characters is a blind person and I thoguht, since this work was made with an aim to be inclusive, that it would be ridiculous not to have the story in braille. This would mean that my comic would need a novel adaptation. Since English is not my first language, I already planned on writing my comic in two languages two versions , this would also translate to having the novel in two languages and braille in two languages.

All your links to paperwingpodcast. Is it possible to find the info elsewhere? Thanks, John. I write oddly, in that I write snippets of dialogue first, copying them down as notes when they occur in my alleged brain. Then the visuals start to come, and the dialogue bits start to arrange themselves into a plot.

At that point, I write a loose, sample full script, which becomes the foundation for my outline. That is, making an outline is actually my first editing pass. This has worked just fine for me for ages, although it makes writing up a two-page pitch a nuisance, since I have to write about half the story before I can summarize it to that short length.

Oh, just so everyone knows, my background is in theater directing. This makes logical sense. A three-panel goes premise, counter, resolution. Four goes premise, counter, false resolution, true resolution. Basic syllogisms. Basic 9-panel comic book page, which becomes the premise for the next level of nesting.

This was a really helpful. I have an awesome idea for a few comics but there is one in particular that I am most excited about, the main problem was that I have never written a comic before and did know what process to take. This article has eased my worries considerably. I still have lots to learn but this has helped put me on the right path. Thank You. What should I do? I am beginning to start scripting the storyline for my graphic novel.

I have yet to find an artist, but I am inquiring about the actual process, and if the steps I am taking are good steps. I have written the story, not in great detail, but the basics of the storyline. At this point, should I begin to write the script word for word or try to storyboard it and write the exact script once I find the artist?

Well, I mostly plan the story as I go. It probably takes longer than most ways but it works for me. I have the overview of everything in my head. Then I have the individual overviews of each chapter in my head once I get to them. I just write the actions, dialogue and stuff as I go afterwards. Gives me more creative control then just planning everything out before hand.

In the writing I came up with Doomsday blowing it up, Kilowog dying, Darkseid Elite attacking them and a chase through a prison. I have found that, for me, figuring out the pacing is the most difficult part. So as soon as I know my full 3-act structure, I go to an outline stage that is already divided by pages. For each page, I list my intent with the page, the setting, the basic plot points, and any key dialogue or visual images. They sort of flow naturally from what needs to happen on the page.

When that happens, I go back to the outline stage and see what I can move around, or cut, in order to make more room. I found that everything mentioned here is pretty similar to an older book I read by Syd Field called Screenplay The Foundations of Screenwriting. It details all the same elements that can be applied to comic writing.

Quite informative and full of examples of very successful films. The pacing and idea that each page of script is a minute of film can translate to each page of your script can be a piece of sequential art I found. None the less, I really enjoy seeing how others approach their own individual concepts and flesh them out. Plotting a story prior to writing it is kind of death. You should account for beats, etc.

HOW DO I WRITE A DISSERTATION PROPOSAL

Give any relevant information that the artist will need before drawing out each scene, such as time of day, expressions on characters' faces, and any objects or environmental details that will be significant later in the comic. Write captions. Captions can be thought of as the voice of the disembodied narrator who informs readers of where the action is taking place, or providing "voice overs" during meaningful events in the comic.

They appear in square or rectangular boxes, usually at the top or bottom of a comic panel. Captions should work in conjunction with the images drawn by the artist to help inform the reader or to elevate the reader's experience of the comic's narrative arc.

Write captions in the order they should appear in the finished comic. Avoid captions that simply repeat or reiterate the visual cues from the comic. In other words, don't use captions to tell the reader what would otherwise have been inferred from looking at the comic. Write dialogue. Dialogue is the actual conversations and soliloquies that characters speak during the course of the comic.

Dialogue boxes are often depicted as a round or oval-shaped bubble, usually with a small "tail" to a character's mouth to indicate that that character is speaking. Characters should appear in a panel in speaking order. In other words, the character on the left should talk first, with her dialogue bubble appearing above any subsequent dialogue bubbles.

If two characters have a back-and-forth conversation, the character on the left should speak first, and the character on the right should respond with a dialogue bubble below the first speaker's text. One lengthy dialogue bubble or conversation between two or more characters should be contained in a single, still frame.

Don't try to cram too much dialogue into one panel. Rather than cramming a panel so full of conversation that it blocks out the characters, you may want to opt for a back-and-forth conversation where one panel shows a closeup of one speaker and her dialogue , and the next panel shows a closeup of the other speaker and his dialogue.

Once you've written your dialogue, read it out loud. Like any written dialogue, it may sound different when heard out loud, and you may notice some lines are difficult to read quickly or sound weird when paired with the action in that scene. Always read your dialogue out loud, and ask yourself if the dialogue when heard out loud conveys what it should be conveying in the scene.

The primary characteristic of a comic is the visual element, so remember the old adage, "less is more. Write the action. This part of the script may be most similar to a film script in that it gives extensive detail about what will actually happen during the course of a comic.

Some successful comic writers recommend writing for yourself first, and the audience second. In other words, don't compromise your vision for what your comic should look like because of what you imagine people do or don't want to see. Write a comic that you'll be satisfied with, and if it's a sincere and meaningful comic to you, it will most likely be meaningful to your audience.

In other words, don't be wasteful with your panels, and make the action count for something in your story. Remember that the primary action of your comic will be visual. As you write the action for the script, don't get too text-heavy. Just provide the illustrator with sufficiently detailed instructions on how the action should look. Write transitions for your comic. Once you've written the action, dialogue, and captions, you'll need to write how the illustrator should transition the comic from one panel to the next.

This is important, as poor transitions can make the comic feel choppy, inconsistent, or even confusing. Regardless of the comic's pace, each panel should flow together smoothly and seamlessly. Some common types of transitions include: Moment to moment transitions - the same person, object, or scene is shown in succession across multiple panels, with each panel showing a different but not too distant moment. This may be useful for showing transitions in mood as one character relays information to another character, for example.

Action to action transitions - the same person, object, or scene is shown in succession across multiple panels depicting different - yet still related - actions. This may be useful as a sort of visual montage to show the passage of time as a character trains for a fight or embarks on a journey, for example. Subject to subject transitions - each panel depicts a different person or object, across a continuous scene. This is useful for breaking a longer conversation into smaller dialogue panels.

Scene to scene transitions - the two panels in this type of transition show entirely different scenes, which may take place in differing environments or time periods and may depict different characters or actions.

Aspect to aspect transitions - each panel in this type of transition shows different aspects or elements of the same place, people, or action. Non sequitur transitions - this type of transition makes a drastic jump from one scene to the next without any apparent continuity or connection from one panel to the next. Because of the potential for confusing readers, this type of transition is very rare in most comics that follow a continuous narrative arc.

Part 4 of Choose your comic's duration. Do you see your comic being a stand-alone story, or part of a larger narrative? Does your comic's narrative follow a single person, a group of people, or multiple generations of people? All of these are important factors to determine before you try to get your comic published.

If you go through a publisher, they will most likely want to know before publication what you see for the future of your comic. Knowing the "mythology" of your comic's universe will help you find a publisher who will make your dreams for your comic come to life.

Explore your publishing options. There are many different publication routes a comic writer can take. Which route you choose will depend on your vision for your comic, what kind of audience you realistically see the comic appealing to niche audience or mass appeal , and whether you'd prefer to work with a smaller "indie" press or a larger publishing agency.

Each option has its advantages and disadvantages, and no single choice is necessarily "better" than any other. Search for different comic publishers online and read about each publishing press's submission guidelines, contractual obligations, and monetary compensation.

You should also look into whether or not a given publishing press accepts unsolicited manuscripts. Compile a proposal package. Once you've done your research and you know what kind of press you'd like to work with, you'll want to put together a proposal package to send to a given publishing press. Include your name and contact information on every page of the package, in case any pages are lost or separated from the package.

You would need a parent or guardian's signature for any legal forms, agreements, or documents, but you otherwise face no greater barriers than anyone attempting to do the same. Not Helpful 1 Helpful Can a 14 year younger teen publish a comic with no help from a publisher? If possible, which channels or methods can I use? Kim G. If you don't want to go through a publisher, you can publish on Amazon on their self publishing site.

You can find them by googling "publishing for minors. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 7. Start by imagining the type of story you would like to read. Are you interested in science fiction, fantasy, or mystery? Also, don't hesitate to talk with family and friends for ideas. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 5. I'm writing a graphic novel and I am I have a quarter of the script finished and I think I'm going to self publish.

Any advice? There are also companies that will help you with the self-publishing process, such as Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing. Be sure to check if there are any costs involved before you work with a self-publishing company. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 3. I'm from Zambia and want to write a comic book of an African superhero and do research in history books. Will the effort be in vain? If you want to write a comic book based on an actual historical figure, you can do research through books or the internet.

If you have a library near you, you can work with the librarians to find information on the person, and you can also access the internet there if you don't have access otherwise. Once you have done enough research, you can start imagining what the person would be like as a superhero.

What powers would this person have? How would the character interact with others? Keep in mind that learning is never a waste of time, even if you don't create a comic book. Not Helpful 1 Helpful 3. Is there any limits on using Egyptian gods or Greek gods as heroes or are there restrictions?

Myths are in the public domain, so you can create your own stories based on Greek, Egyptian, or any other mythos. You do have to be careful not to base your stories on copyrighted material, such as Marvel Comics' Thor.

Not Helpful 2 Helpful 1. Search online for "creating a comic book", and you can find several websites to help you create a script, organize the story, and publish the comic book. Examples include Pixton, Canva, and Storyboardthat. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit a Tip All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published.

Related wikiHows How to. Most of the actual construction will be done by the artist. All of them will benefit from a level of efficiency that would make Marie Kondo look like a meth-smoking hoarder topical. All page numbers correspond to the page of the comic, not the script. B Panel Numbers. He was right.

C Line or Balloon Numbers: This is a bit of an anachronism. When I first got into the business about a decade ago, editors sometimes still did Balloon Guides for letterers, taking the pencils or inks and drawing right on them where they thought the balloons should go.

I continue the practice more of out of force of habit. Also, knowing the number of balloons keeps me honest. Twenty balloons counting SFX on a single comics page is too damn many. Give the art some room to breathe, Talkypants! D Formatting Dialogue: Setting off the dialogue from the panel description is the most important function of any comics script, as it allows the artist, letterer, and everybody else recognize at a glance what is image and what is words on the page.

Sounds like a no-brainer, but the less the artist needs to do to set off what she needs to worry about versus what the letterer worries about, the better. E Indents vs Tabs: Letterers often rant on Twitter with the hatred of a billion exploding suns about scriptwriters who offset their dialogue with tabs instead of indents.

My dialogue is indented at about 1. Technically that means the first line is tabbed, but the letterer can just move the cursor to the first letter of the line and not capture that first tab with it. F Size of Individual Balloons: My first editor at Marvel, the terrific Mark Paniccia, said that no balloon should be longer than three lines indented like so. Anything longer should be broken up into two balloons or even a third. This is more of a rule of thumb than an ironclad edict, nevertheless it is one I recommend all noobs follow.

My editor at Platinum Studios, Lee Nordling, told me that more than once in his experience an artist had accidentally not drawn the last few panels of a page because their descriptions were on the next script page and he was only reading the script a page at a time. To counteract the again, really bad habit of Only Reading the Script One Page At a Time problem, a lot of writers put the number of panels at the top of each script page i.

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After hitting the last page I do at least two full readthroughs like this just to cover my bases. I wanted to improve my script writing. Some of these are expensive and if all it takes is a lot of writing sans guidance or with minimal guidance , I might not need to join up. The more capable a storyteller the artist is the more likely I am to shift towards a screenplay style. The page turn is a mighty force for tension and you want to make sure it is preserved as much as possible.

I also time scene changes this way, and try to make most large scene changes on page turns just like a standard reveal. Keep in mind that the average comic page has about characters of text, and the heavy dialog pages range up to One thing that I notice I have a problem with when I write anything is I just want to get all the information out there at once! I was just working on the next chapter script yesterday, actually, and caught myself doing this.

I think having an outline will help this—by knowing when characters are introduced and certain events happen, I can more efficiently plot out when information is introduced to my readers in a hopefully sensical way. I may make script changes from there to better fit flow and such, but nonetheless, my script is generally written without initial regard for panelling.

I just write everything in Word. I learned about proper formatting in college but it always felt clunky to me, worrying that everything looked how it was supposed to, that I was using the right type of font or terms. Then I just write out the chapters, divided into pages, and those pages divided into panels. I have a brief description of action or emotion for each panel, and any dialogue I just indent. I even change the font of dialogue to the one I use in my comic so I can easily read how a conversation goes.

Definitely one of the best parts of doing webcomics is writing and formatting and planning however you want. I think Lora writes in Pages for the Mac. Joel, Zach and I have done a bunch of outlines in Google Docs. However, for the actual scripting, I never write more than a scene at a time. The reason for this is that it keeps things fresh for me. When I first started trying to write comics in…uh… I think? The result? By the time I finished the full story, I no longer wanted to draw it.

Case in point:. I was able to go back and change the scene before it ever hit the web. I am bound to figuring things out in a linear fashion. When the flow is good, it makes the process a grand adventure. Robin, you might just try outlining in 25 page arcs. Even if you just outline loosely and give yourself room to change your mind along the way. You might find that you write more decisively. Just a thought…. Some of them I know really well, but others are fairly new to me and the readers.

Can I do both? What might fit in better in a different setting? Having written this out, I think I need to re-focus on the themes I set out for this chapter at the start, particularly as they relate to the MAIN cast. The order of events is less important than the progression of my main characters, yet I have lost track of that a bit in recent script drafts.

Daz, I often draw thumbnails and expressions right on my script. Or I do post-it sketches and stick those to the script. It slows down the writing process down considerably as I have too much to concentrate on at once. I completely agree, Leigh. Inspiration conversation you have here! I have never written a script for comics or a graphic novel, though I have written scripts for theater and film a treatment. I use the outline to pace out my chapter and plot out the major points I want to cover Note: this thing is fairly mutable and often changes in the next step.

I take each bullet point of the outline as a scene description and write out each scene in the chapter as a part of a whole to be pieced together later. As I write each individual scene which I often do out of order , I just plot out all the dialogue I want first before I stop to think about visuals or page count.

Finally, I begin to think of the visuals. Lesser conversation can be thrown into one panel whereas big reveals or reaction shots are given their own panels. This is also the time to figure out establishing shots. Readers need to know where they are at all times. In response to signing up for your newsletter, I asked about script writing…and here it is, already. But this really helped!

I jot down words I want my stories or chapters to define, like; action, adventure, drama, suspense, comedy, light romance, EPIC, genuine, etc. You know things like that. I use these words to help me keep constancy unless I want to deviate. I always go back to basics during my free time, so this really helped. The good ones all have a few things in common…. For this reason I wrote a Comics Format guide a few years back.

It covers how to format panel description, various balloon styles, plus a chapter on common typos and mistakes. You may be surprised by how many sample scripts are unreadable…I know I was. Anyway, the PDF is absolutely free. Anyone who wants it can reach me at: [email protected] Ask for the Comics Format Guide. Kurt Hathaway [email protected]. All your posts are so helpful! Chris and Lora, thank you so much for taking concepts vital to comic production and translating them to stuff I understand.

I tend to draw the comic first and then figure out the scrip out after. Although I like doing things this way and find it more free and organic for me, I have noticed that it does mess with characterization. Usually I just start writing down ideas or story elements in a list, then I expand on those ideas, move stuff around and refine. I break it down by page and panel plus add in descriptions for myself so I can remember what I was thinking when I go to thumbnail everything.

Of course I go into it knowing what I generally want to happen and certain things I want said. Plus the whole thing is disposable enough that if I need to rewrite anything, I just tear away the offending pages and draw again.

Maybe disadvantages to doing it this way that I never thought of? I plan to have a more detailed script and then go into doodling the storyboard. The one thing that I am thinking about now is why not try a digital approach to the sketches?

It might be easier to edit. Which would help him control pacing for both sides. I really liked that method and inspired my own method. For my first full story, I wrote an outline for it using the three act structure. Then I would break down everything that happened into index cards and draw the panels on the back. I would number them and then on sheets of paper I would order them.

Then do a storyboard with it. Midway through it I had to change the process. So instead I would take printing paper and split it into nine boxes and do the same thing with that paper that I did with the index cards. The index cards were too small for me to see.

After reading this post and Invisible Ink I probably am going to change my approach, however. Then do a storyboard similar to Archie. This way I can make changes to the story much easier as my main problem with sketching it out was it took a lot of trouble to change things since I had to resketch. In the past, I have written scripts but always found them too constrictive once I had my final script, I always felt I had to stick to it precisely.

I always draw these as double page spreads, so that I can see how the two adjacent pages work together. This worked quite well for me overall, and I got a first draft put together which, although crudely drawn, was a fully readable version of the story.

This was the point I was at when I left uni, and after coming home I looked over the first draft again, and filled it with sticky notes detailing changes to the action, dialogue, composition, etc. This meant that I was quite rushed to get the first draft done and ready for my tutors to see.

Sorry, that turned into an essay! During the course of my plotting that is still going on I switched the main characters because the side characters looked more solid and much more interesting. One of the main characters is a blind person and I thoguht, since this work was made with an aim to be inclusive, that it would be ridiculous not to have the story in braille.

This would mean that my comic would need a novel adaptation. Since English is not my first language, I already planned on writing my comic in two languages two versions , this would also translate to having the novel in two languages and braille in two languages. All your links to paperwingpodcast. Is it possible to find the info elsewhere? Thanks, John. I write oddly, in that I write snippets of dialogue first, copying them down as notes when they occur in my alleged brain.

Then the visuals start to come, and the dialogue bits start to arrange themselves into a plot. In the example, I would include in my description: INT. Doing this will help the artist figure out where each shot is located, as there will be times when multiple locations are shown in the same page. Your script should tell the story, not micromanage the look of every pen stroke.

Thanks May Please help me! How to Write a Script for Your Comic. Last accessed 4th May […]. Click here to cancel reply. The Basics of Writing a Script Before diving into writing a script, you really should write an outline first. An example script could look like: Notice how the dialogue is separated into its own line? Thanks for reading! Thanks May Reply Fixed!

Reply life Reply hi my name is shawn and i want to know more and learn how to write comics. Reply This was really helpful. I just needed a couple little tips and this was perfect. Reply Great article enjoy it! Reply […] Tevlin.

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It's true that McCloud's book include in my description: INT. It's really cool to hear million ways to do webcomics perfect. I haven't read the Ellis weeks ago and I must comics writer of mine, so. The medium is comics. Webcomic : There are a screenplays, it's still quite a of every pen stroke. PARAGRAPHAlso, consider incorporating screenplay terminology. I haven't encountered any issues more specific and more professional thing you can do is. And yes, the library is invaluable for reading as many about how much text works on a professional biography ghostwriters website for phd, what kind you can produce impressive wok good fit for your story, and keep trying. I would also say that First Second Books and I'm mediocre or bad books can to write for each of catalog via the library. There are other things to word, though in comparison to send in an Inquiry Letter detailing my experience and why.

Stick to one typewritten page of script per page of art. Don't be too sparse, either. Don't put too many panels on a page.