author essays elia

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Author essays elia

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Probably Lamb's best work, though he is also remembered for his children's versions of Shakespeare and Homer which he wrote with his sister Mary who became his charge after her bout with insanity in when she killed their mother.

Short 8vos, finely bound by Tout in full polished calf; ornate gilt-decorated spines with raised bands, inner dentelles, marbled endpapers, a. First editions The first volume has a scuff mark on the front cover, and is a second issue, with two addresses in the imprint.

Published by Carey, Lea and Carey, Philadelphia, First edition. The American precedes the English issue of the Second Series. This is an unauthorized edition. With a copy of the second American edition of the First Series. Roff, p. Provenance: Mrs. Scattered foxing throughout. Half crimson morocco slipcase and chemise First edition. Published by Edward Moxon, London, First edition, first issue of the first series; first English edition of the second series.

A Lovely Copy. An irresistible copy of Lamb's classic essays. Fine [2], ; xii, pp. Seller: Royoung Bookseller, Inc. First edition, first issue; Fleet Street address in Vol. I, and half title Vol. A large portion of Lamb's biography can be taken from the Essays. Using his own impressions and recollections as a text for his work, he wrote without a trace of egotism or self-assertion.

Both volumes lack adverts. Exceptional copies, double gilt cover border panels, raised bands, spine panels decorated with gilt floral motifs, elaborate inner dentelles, blue watered silk endpapers. Full late nineteenth century red morocco gilt. Fine in fine matching red cloth slipcase. Published by London Taylor and Hessey and Seller: Buddenbrooks, Inc. Used - Softcover. Together two volumes. First English Edition.

A fine copy. First Edition, First Issue, of volume 1 with the imprint having only the single address for the publishers listed, and 6 pages publisher's advertisements, half-title in volume 2 only as called for , and with the two leaves of publisher's advertisements.

The essays in the collection first began appearing in The London Magazine in and continued to Lamb's essays were very popular, the personal and conversational tone of the essays has charmed many readers. They "established Lamb in the title he now holds, that of the most delightful of English essayists. Published by London: Printed for Taylor and Hessey, Hard Cover.

First edition, first issue, published without the half-title, with the publisher's single-line Fleet Street address to the tile page, lacking publisher's terminal advertisements. Finely bound in full navy morocco, with five raised bands to the spine, decorative gilt stamping to the spine bands and compartments, spine lettered in gilt, boards ruled in gilt, all edges gilt, elaborate gilt turn-ins, maroon coated endpapers. Very good or better, with some light wear and rubbing to the extremities, a hint of toning to the spine, front hinge tender with some wear, front hinge repaired, bright and fresh pages.

A clean copy of the scarce first issue in a lovely morocco binding. Elia is a collection of Lamb's popular essays, each of which was originally published in London Magazine. Lamb, a long-time clerk for the British East India Company, began writing essays under the pseudonym "Elia," which he derived from a former colleague's surname. Lamb wrote in a colloquial and conversational style that made his essays beloved by his Edwardian and Victorian readers.

Additionally, Lamb included many of his friends and family in his writing, loosely disguised by initials and pseudonyms. Interestingly, while the American edition of the first collection, published by Carey, Lea, and Carey in Philadelphia, was preceded by this first British edition by five years, the American issue of the second collection preceded its British counterpart; less restricted by copyright laws in the United States, the American publishers were able to issue both Elia volumes simultaneously in Skerrett , Philadelphia, First U.

These eloquently written pieces mingle humor and pathos as they describe the experiences of the author and his acquaintances while attending boarding school, playing whist, listening to music, visiting Quaker meetings, etc.

Food is a recurring topic "A Dissertation upon Roast Pig" ; there are two essays on Valentine's Day one in each volume , and several on plays and actors. The first series made its first appearance in book form in London, The authorized second series was not published until , under the title The Last Essays of Elia; the pieces selected for the unauthorized American second series offered here are different from those contained in that volume, and mistakenly include three essays written by other hands.

I: pp. II: pp. I: Uncut copy. Publisher's quarter once-red cloth and paper sides, covers printed with "Elia" within a simple frame, spine with printed paper label; binding rubbed and lightly soiled, spine sunned to yellow. Repaired tear to one leaf, touching text without loss; remarkably clean and sound. II: Contemporary speckled sheep, spine with gilt-stamped leather title-label; rubbed, and head of spine chipped with old refurbishing.

Author's name inked on title-page; front free endpaper and title-page reinforced at fore-edge the latter from the back. Both volumes age-toned, with intermittent spots of staining; advertisements absent. The set now housed in a quarter blue morocco and blue cloth? Second Series. Second Series" volume two is an unauthorized edition. Livingston, p. Volume two with ownership stamps and signature on title page, with part eradicated.

Scattered foxing throughout, front hinge tender. Half crimson morocco slipcase and chemise. Bookplate of Robert S. Pirie First edition. Seller: Charles Agvent, est. Bound with half titles but without ads in the first volume.

About Fine and attractively bound. From United Kingdom to U. None illustrator. An unauthorised first American edition of the collected essays of Charles Lamb. Very scarce in the publisher's original boards. Lamb's essays were highly popular and were printed in many subsequent editions throughout the nineteenth century. The personal and conversational tone of the essays has charmed many readers; the essays "established Lamb in the title he now holds, that of the most delightful of English essayists.

American editions of both the Essays and the Last Essays were published in Philadelphia in At the time, American publishers were unconstrained by nuisances like copyright law, and often reprinted materials from English books and periodicals; so the American collection of the Last Essays preceded its British counterpart by five years.

In a quarter cloth binding with paper covered boards. Expertly rebacked with gilt titling to spine. Externally, worn, though spine remains smart. Front hinge held by cords only. Internally, generally firmly bound. One or two unopened pages. Slight age-toning to pages and some spotting. Very Good. Published by Taylor and Hessey, London, Used - Softcover Condition: Fine.

Fine Binding. Condition: Fine. The first edition of this famous essay collection by Charles. In a stunning quarter calf binding with marbled boards, this excellent copy would make a beautiful addition to any library. The first edition, second issue, with the publisher's address having the added '13 Waterloo Place'.

With the publisher's adverts to the rear. Bound without the half-title as is quite common with this work. These essays, which first appeared in 'The London Magazine' between and were extremely popular due to their conversational nature and personal tone. Lamb had the ability to make his readers feel a personal connection through his narrative voice. This work comprises of twenty-eight essays total, most of which are autobiographical. They discuss numerous subjects through Lamb's own experiences.

A stunning copy of this famous essay collection. Rebound, in a quarter calf binding with marbled paper boards. Externally, excellent condition with very little shelfwear. Internally, firmly bound. Pages are bright with just the odd spot. Livingston p. Original printed yellow-coated boards, linen spine, uncut. Brock Illustration :. Published by London, Dent and Co. First Edition Signed. From Germany to U. Published by Gregynog Press, UK, Used - Hardcover Condition: Near Fine. Condition: Near Fine.

Bray, Horace Walter illustrator. Olive green buckram with bevelled edges, gilt titling to the spine panel. Wood engraved headpieces by H. Limited to copies - this being copy number A bright UK limited edition set. The Wrapper : No wrapper as issued. The Book : The books are bright, clean and tight. There are no previous ownership inscriptions.

No fading, no toning, tight bindings. Both volumes have dusty top edges and an attractive former owner's bookplate on the front pastedowns. Attractive copies. Paypal accepted. From Australia to U. Octavo, 6pp. First edition, second issue: Lamb's most famous work.

Writing as 'Elia' for the London magazine, the graceful irony of Lamb's essays was immediately popular, and his unaffected, inclusive style brought a poise rarely equalled in the essayist. Nonetheless, Elia sold poorly, a fact which contributes to the work's rarity. A strong copy although the cloth shows some wear, top half of spine present but loose.

Published by G. Putnam's Sons N. Very Good in boards. Minimal edge wear, light soiling. Suffered from melancholia and nostalgia, gargled gin and water. Sister killed mother with a table knife, then went on to write children's versions of Shakespeare's comedies. He wrote the tragedies. View 1 comment. Jan 01, Sean rated it liked it Recommends it for: over-excited people who need to be calmed down.

Shelves: essays. I give up! I appreciate Lamb's skill but I, a somewhat well-educated and moderately intelligent reader, find him too hard to keep up with. Several times I found myself reading along like a good citizen of the literary highway and Wham! Out of the blue I realize I have no idea where I am or how I got there.

Som I give up! Some of that is probably my fault, but some of it, I think, just might be the fault of L. I have too much money invested in sweaters. But B H has nothing sensible to say to my confundment or perplexification on attempting to read L in his guise of E Don't get me wrong. It's not all just confusification and haplidolidol. I read "The South Sea House," in which, pointless as it was, Lamb did a fine job of delineating the characters of several persons so carefully I felt I knew them, before he pulled the rug from under me.

In "Oxford in the vacation" he had a couple of good sentences, but I don't have the energy to go looking for them to quote them. As Elia, Lamb severely disagrees with an essay he had written under his own name about the orphanage in which he grew up. As Lamb he seems to have thought it a rather decent place. As Elia, he found it horrid and abusive, the terrible conditions and hatred of children we expect of that era from having read Dickens.

This was masterful and worth the read. Then I pressed on and read "The two races of Men. He divides humans into two "races:" those who lend and those who borrow. He humorously finds the borrowers to be more expansive and interesting than the lenders. I was expecting to have a serendipitous time with many witty or insightful observations, but, sadly, no. It was interesting to find that so long ago New Year's was as big a day, with its different ways of being celebrated, as it is today.

And I meant to but did not take to heart his practice of reviewing the old year first and then planning for the new. But it was tedious and dull and confusing and I forced myself to the end and then I quit. By all means, read Lamb for historical interest if you like, and I hope you find it more interesting than I did. But life is short and if you have too many books on your list, skip this one for now. Aug 12, Jamie rated it liked it.

This is what happens when you read essays written years ago, in which the author has contemporary readers strictly in mind: complete and utter lack of historical context. The strange thing was, I loved his writing style precisely because it is so old-fashioned and, well, archaic. On the flip side, this anachronistic quality dooms some of his essay to obscurity when he spends dozens of pages waxing long about theatre players whom he obviously expects the reader to have prior knowledge of.

The This is what happens when you read essays written years ago, in which the author has contemporary readers strictly in mind: complete and utter lack of historical context. There are end notes written circa to help the reader on their way, but I have an unfortunate aversion to reading end notes so perhaps I am partly to blame for my lack of comprehension at some parts in the reading of these essays.

Those made me chuckle. Apr 25, Anna-karien Otto rated it really liked it. Really enjoyed it. Anne Fadiman put me onto his trail The peaks of these essays are exceptionally high, but one gets one's fair share of plateaus and depths.

Elia is at his best when he plays with you. The essays in this vein play with your expectations in such a uniquely flamboyant way, yet there's something melancholic and sweet about how they do so. Then there ar The peaks of these essays are exceptionally high, but one gets one's fair share of plateaus and depths. Then there are straightforwardly fabulous pieces of essayistic observation, such as in the sundry musings on work and idleness in 'The Superannuated Man' and in his description of a Quaker meeting — probably one of the greatest ever written.

However, many of the other essays are dedicated to specific authors I haven't read, actors I haven't seen nor has any living person , and feelings I haven't felt such as in the appallingly lazy xenophobia of 'Imperfect Sympathies'. But I still like the book overall.

Pick it up and find some of the greatest English essays ever written! May 05, Al rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. These essays evoke different reactions based on their topic and especially how Lamb frames the essay itself. I felt that I almost needed a warm up period for this book because it took a couple of pages before I accustomed myself to his language and style of writing.

However, once I got going, I truly enjoyed his essays on saying grace before a meal, the two types of races: borrowers and lenders, and the nostalgia of the South Sea House. The essays need to be read slowly and deliberately, as I be These essays evoke different reactions based on their topic and especially how Lamb frames the essay itself.

The essays need to be read slowly and deliberately, as I believe that in this way, you can truly appreciate style and language of the author. Yet I then scarce conceived what it meant, or thought of it as a reckoning that concerned me. Not childhood alo "The elders, with whom I was brought up, were of a character not likely to let slip the sacred observance of any old institution; and the ring out of the Old Year was kept by them with circumstances of peculiar ceremony.

Not childhood alone, but the young man till thirty, never feels practically that he is mortal. He knows it indeed, and, if need were, he could preach a homily on the fragility of life; but he brings it not home to himself, any more than in a hot June we can appropriate to our imagination the freezing days of December. I begin to count the probabilities of my duration, and to grudge at the expenditure of moments and shortest periods, like misers' farthings.

In proportion as the years both lessen and shorten, I set more count upong their periods, and would fain lay my ineffectual finger upon the spoke of the great wheel. I am not content to pass away "like a weaver's shuttle.

I care not to be carried with the tide, that smoothly bears human life to eternity; and reluct at the inevitable course of destiny. I am in love with this green earth; the face of town and country; the unspeakable rural solitudes, and the sweet security of streets. I would set up my tabernacle here. I am content to stand still at the age to which I am arrived; I, and my friends: to be no younger, no richer, no handsomer. I do not want to be weaned by age; or drop, like mellow fruit, as as they say, in to the grave.

My household gods plant a terrible fixed foot, and are not rooted up without blood. They do not willingly seek Lavinian shores. A new state of being staggers me. View 2 comments. Sometimes I get used to finding literary corners thoroughly well-colonised on goodreads and feel surprised when I find one that is less so, as with this.

Anyway, I loved this. It's certainly journalism; the mode is primarily riffs on a superficial theme. Lamb might be a little too affected for some in the way he transitions from the ostensible subject to some other destination or in his conceits; a little too self-consciously quaint perhaps. I didn't really know what to expect, and was a little Sometimes I get used to finding literary corners thoroughly well-colonised on goodreads and feel surprised when I find one that is less so, as with this.

I didn't really know what to expect, and was a little surprised to find the introduction concentrated on nostalgia. But yes, nostalgia is the point here. Little pictures of things and people from Lamb's past, or his present, with the understanding that the present too is already the past as we speak.

Lamb regrets the passing of time. He doesn't want to die and he clings to his world. He appreciates its idiosyncrasies above all, which are always temporary. I found the wistfulness a surprisingly powerful and penetrating atmosphere. Lamb is very honest, in that "personal essay composed by a literary construction" way, about his neediness. I love feeling like I am entering into individual experience and it's especially piquant when the person is long dead. It makes it seem more quintessentially past than our own perspective.

The writing isn't musical; it's hard to make it sound complimentary, but it's like an extremely satisfying mechanical sound that sounds like everything being in exactly the right place. I particularly liked the discussions of actors and how they make a difference to their roles, like different authors writing the same plot, I suppose, and how acting styles have changed; I didn't feel I needed to have seen them. Some reviewers were frustrated by their lack of understanding of contemporary references.

I think this is less of an issue than they realised since to some extent the whole point is that Lamb is talking of things that are no longer current, that he's talking to people who may not remember these things. It took me a while to enjoy Lamb, I confess. At first I was slowed down by the long sentences that seemed unwieldy at first sight, by the vague allusions to a distant past. But suddenly, I'm not quite sure how, he grabbed me.

I realized that he was both charming and a genius. Here are a few of my favorite moments. They don't pack the same punch when taken out of context because part of the delight is the way he uses the essay format to work up to his point , but they are still wonderful.

On a su It took me a while to enjoy Lamb, I confess. On a sundial: "If its business-use be superseded by more elaborate inventions, its moral uses, its beauty, might have pleaded for its continuance. It is a pistol let off at the ear; not a feather to tickle the intellect. May 04, J. Purves rated it it was amazing Shelves: own. This essay collection was stupid because Lamb keeps referring to all these people and events that happened in the s. Mar 16, Allyson rated it it was ok.

Well, I wouldn't normally have picked this book up to read--it's just not the type that usually appeals to me. But I'm endeavoring to broaden my horizons and have challenged myself to read straight across our bookshelf instead of picking and choosing only what jumps out at me.

This book was next in line, so I faithfully read it all the way through, but I wasn't too impressed with it. Some parts were drily humorous--just enough to make me keep reading--but aside from being mildly entertaining, it Well, I wouldn't normally have picked this book up to read--it's just not the type that usually appeals to me.

Some parts were drily humorous--just enough to make me keep reading--but aside from being mildly entertaining, it was pretty dry and at times boring. Apr 25, Ellen rated it it was ok Recommends it for: no one. Shelves: just-couldn-t-make-it-through. I started out enjoying these essays, but as I continued I began to feel as though this writer wasn't a very compassionate or sympathetic person. Really got turned off and decided not to waste my time continuing to force myself myself to continue.

May 07, Tslyklu rated it it was ok. Funny that in depth descriptions of actors and criticisms about theatre hasn't changed in about two-hundred years. Some interesting phrases but very few even entire sentences that aren't kind of "are you done yet?

Sep 30, Jennifer Kepesh rated it liked it. To read Charles Lamb in Elia persona requires a willingness to buy into the persona wholeheartedly. Elia is intended to be a fusty old man with deliberately old-fashioned language usage, as Trollope sometimes did but to an even greater degree. At this remove, with all of his contemporaneous references and in-jokes needing a good deal of footnoting, this particular affectation of the character is something for the reader to tolerate rather than smile at.

The copy of Essays of Elia that I was able To read Charles Lamb in Elia persona requires a willingness to buy into the persona wholeheartedly. The copy of Essays of Elia that I was able to get is a reprint of only a few essays; I also have several of them in the Penguin series, all of which are about food beginning with the Dissertation on Roast Pig.

An essay by Elia is like following a meandering path. What is particularly interesting to a reader of today is Lamb's ability to play at this character and his choice of topics, because Lamb had a particularly tragic life. His mother was murdered by his own sister Mary during a manic phase.

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I appreciate Lamb's skill but I, a somewhat well-educated and moderately intelligent reader, find him too hard to keep up with. Several times I found myself reading along like a good citizen of the literary highway and Wham! Out of the blue I realize I have no idea where I am or how I got there. Som I give up! Some of that is probably my fault, but some of it, I think, just might be the fault of L. I have too much money invested in sweaters. But B H has nothing sensible to say to my confundment or perplexification on attempting to read L in his guise of E Don't get me wrong.

It's not all just confusification and haplidolidol. I read "The South Sea House," in which, pointless as it was, Lamb did a fine job of delineating the characters of several persons so carefully I felt I knew them, before he pulled the rug from under me. In "Oxford in the vacation" he had a couple of good sentences, but I don't have the energy to go looking for them to quote them.

As Elia, Lamb severely disagrees with an essay he had written under his own name about the orphanage in which he grew up. As Lamb he seems to have thought it a rather decent place. As Elia, he found it horrid and abusive, the terrible conditions and hatred of children we expect of that era from having read Dickens. This was masterful and worth the read. Then I pressed on and read "The two races of Men. He divides humans into two "races:" those who lend and those who borrow.

He humorously finds the borrowers to be more expansive and interesting than the lenders. I was expecting to have a serendipitous time with many witty or insightful observations, but, sadly, no. It was interesting to find that so long ago New Year's was as big a day, with its different ways of being celebrated, as it is today.

And I meant to but did not take to heart his practice of reviewing the old year first and then planning for the new. But it was tedious and dull and confusing and I forced myself to the end and then I quit. By all means, read Lamb for historical interest if you like, and I hope you find it more interesting than I did.

But life is short and if you have too many books on your list, skip this one for now. Aug 12, Jamie rated it liked it. This is what happens when you read essays written years ago, in which the author has contemporary readers strictly in mind: complete and utter lack of historical context. The strange thing was, I loved his writing style precisely because it is so old-fashioned and, well, archaic. On the flip side, this anachronistic quality dooms some of his essay to obscurity when he spends dozens of pages waxing long about theatre players whom he obviously expects the reader to have prior knowledge of.

The This is what happens when you read essays written years ago, in which the author has contemporary readers strictly in mind: complete and utter lack of historical context. There are end notes written circa to help the reader on their way, but I have an unfortunate aversion to reading end notes so perhaps I am partly to blame for my lack of comprehension at some parts in the reading of these essays.

Those made me chuckle. Apr 25, Anna-karien Otto rated it really liked it. Really enjoyed it. Anne Fadiman put me onto his trail The peaks of these essays are exceptionally high, but one gets one's fair share of plateaus and depths.

Elia is at his best when he plays with you. The essays in this vein play with your expectations in such a uniquely flamboyant way, yet there's something melancholic and sweet about how they do so. Then there ar The peaks of these essays are exceptionally high, but one gets one's fair share of plateaus and depths.

Then there are straightforwardly fabulous pieces of essayistic observation, such as in the sundry musings on work and idleness in 'The Superannuated Man' and in his description of a Quaker meeting — probably one of the greatest ever written. However, many of the other essays are dedicated to specific authors I haven't read, actors I haven't seen nor has any living person , and feelings I haven't felt such as in the appallingly lazy xenophobia of 'Imperfect Sympathies'.

But I still like the book overall. Pick it up and find some of the greatest English essays ever written! May 05, Al rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. These essays evoke different reactions based on their topic and especially how Lamb frames the essay itself. I felt that I almost needed a warm up period for this book because it took a couple of pages before I accustomed myself to his language and style of writing.

However, once I got going, I truly enjoyed his essays on saying grace before a meal, the two types of races: borrowers and lenders, and the nostalgia of the South Sea House. The essays need to be read slowly and deliberately, as I be These essays evoke different reactions based on their topic and especially how Lamb frames the essay itself. The essays need to be read slowly and deliberately, as I believe that in this way, you can truly appreciate style and language of the author.

Yet I then scarce conceived what it meant, or thought of it as a reckoning that concerned me. Not childhood alo "The elders, with whom I was brought up, were of a character not likely to let slip the sacred observance of any old institution; and the ring out of the Old Year was kept by them with circumstances of peculiar ceremony.

Not childhood alone, but the young man till thirty, never feels practically that he is mortal. He knows it indeed, and, if need were, he could preach a homily on the fragility of life; but he brings it not home to himself, any more than in a hot June we can appropriate to our imagination the freezing days of December. I begin to count the probabilities of my duration, and to grudge at the expenditure of moments and shortest periods, like misers' farthings.

In proportion as the years both lessen and shorten, I set more count upong their periods, and would fain lay my ineffectual finger upon the spoke of the great wheel. I am not content to pass away "like a weaver's shuttle. I care not to be carried with the tide, that smoothly bears human life to eternity; and reluct at the inevitable course of destiny. I am in love with this green earth; the face of town and country; the unspeakable rural solitudes, and the sweet security of streets. I would set up my tabernacle here.

I am content to stand still at the age to which I am arrived; I, and my friends: to be no younger, no richer, no handsomer. I do not want to be weaned by age; or drop, like mellow fruit, as as they say, in to the grave. My household gods plant a terrible fixed foot, and are not rooted up without blood. They do not willingly seek Lavinian shores. A new state of being staggers me. View 2 comments. Sometimes I get used to finding literary corners thoroughly well-colonised on goodreads and feel surprised when I find one that is less so, as with this.

Anyway, I loved this. It's certainly journalism; the mode is primarily riffs on a superficial theme. Lamb might be a little too affected for some in the way he transitions from the ostensible subject to some other destination or in his conceits; a little too self-consciously quaint perhaps. I didn't really know what to expect, and was a little Sometimes I get used to finding literary corners thoroughly well-colonised on goodreads and feel surprised when I find one that is less so, as with this.

I didn't really know what to expect, and was a little surprised to find the introduction concentrated on nostalgia. But yes, nostalgia is the point here. Little pictures of things and people from Lamb's past, or his present, with the understanding that the present too is already the past as we speak.

Lamb regrets the passing of time. He doesn't want to die and he clings to his world. He appreciates its idiosyncrasies above all, which are always temporary. I found the wistfulness a surprisingly powerful and penetrating atmosphere.

Lamb is very honest, in that "personal essay composed by a literary construction" way, about his neediness. I love feeling like I am entering into individual experience and it's especially piquant when the person is long dead. It makes it seem more quintessentially past than our own perspective. The writing isn't musical; it's hard to make it sound complimentary, but it's like an extremely satisfying mechanical sound that sounds like everything being in exactly the right place.

I particularly liked the discussions of actors and how they make a difference to their roles, like different authors writing the same plot, I suppose, and how acting styles have changed; I didn't feel I needed to have seen them. Some reviewers were frustrated by their lack of understanding of contemporary references.

I think this is less of an issue than they realised since to some extent the whole point is that Lamb is talking of things that are no longer current, that he's talking to people who may not remember these things. It took me a while to enjoy Lamb, I confess. At first I was slowed down by the long sentences that seemed unwieldy at first sight, by the vague allusions to a distant past. But suddenly, I'm not quite sure how, he grabbed me. I realized that he was both charming and a genius.

Here are a few of my favorite moments. They don't pack the same punch when taken out of context because part of the delight is the way he uses the essay format to work up to his point , but they are still wonderful. On a su It took me a while to enjoy Lamb, I confess. On a sundial: "If its business-use be superseded by more elaborate inventions, its moral uses, its beauty, might have pleaded for its continuance.

It is a pistol let off at the ear; not a feather to tickle the intellect. May 04, J. Purves rated it it was amazing Shelves: own. This essay collection was stupid because Lamb keeps referring to all these people and events that happened in the s. Mar 16, Allyson rated it it was ok. Well, I wouldn't normally have picked this book up to read--it's just not the type that usually appeals to me. But I'm endeavoring to broaden my horizons and have challenged myself to read straight across our bookshelf instead of picking and choosing only what jumps out at me.

This book was next in line, so I faithfully read it all the way through, but I wasn't too impressed with it. Some parts were drily humorous--just enough to make me keep reading--but aside from being mildly entertaining, it Well, I wouldn't normally have picked this book up to read--it's just not the type that usually appeals to me. Some parts were drily humorous--just enough to make me keep reading--but aside from being mildly entertaining, it was pretty dry and at times boring.

Apr 25, Ellen rated it it was ok Recommends it for: no one. Shelves: just-couldn-t-make-it-through. I started out enjoying these essays, but as I continued I began to feel as though this writer wasn't a very compassionate or sympathetic person. Really got turned off and decided not to waste my time continuing to force myself myself to continue. May 07, Tslyklu rated it it was ok.

Funny that in depth descriptions of actors and criticisms about theatre hasn't changed in about two-hundred years. Some interesting phrases but very few even entire sentences that aren't kind of "are you done yet? Sep 30, Jennifer Kepesh rated it liked it. To read Charles Lamb in Elia persona requires a willingness to buy into the persona wholeheartedly. Elia is intended to be a fusty old man with deliberately old-fashioned language usage, as Trollope sometimes did but to an even greater degree.

At this remove, with all of his contemporaneous references and in-jokes needing a good deal of footnoting, this particular affectation of the character is something for the reader to tolerate rather than smile at. The copy of Essays of Elia that I was able To read Charles Lamb in Elia persona requires a willingness to buy into the persona wholeheartedly. The copy of Essays of Elia that I was able to get is a reprint of only a few essays; I also have several of them in the Penguin series, all of which are about food beginning with the Dissertation on Roast Pig.

An essay by Elia is like following a meandering path. What is particularly interesting to a reader of today is Lamb's ability to play at this character and his choice of topics, because Lamb had a particularly tragic life. His mother was murdered by his own sister Mary during a manic phase. He was able to have her released to his custody eventually instead of having her consigned to a madhouse.

For the rest of her life, he took care of her, but her malady returned more than once and was an awful thing for both of them to live with. But he didn't just give her a home; he gave her occupation as well, co-authoring the Stories from Shakespeare with her. He could, obviously, not marry. His was a fairly wretched life, objectively, but he chose to be cheerful, to find an outlet in written wit and in reading.

May 29, Jane Hoppe rated it it was ok. I loved Lamb's language but was not astute enough to find his meaning. I: Uncut copy. Publisher's quarter once-red cloth and paper sides, covers printed with "Elia" within a simple frame, spine with printed paper label; binding rubbed and lightly soiled, spine sunned to yellow.

Repaired tear to one leaf, touching text without loss; remarkably clean and sound. II: Contemporary speckled sheep, spine with gilt-stamped leather title-label; rubbed, and head of spine chipped with old refurbishing. Author's name inked on title-page; front free endpaper and title-page reinforced at fore-edge the latter from the back.

Both volumes age-toned, with intermittent spots of staining; advertisements absent. The set now housed in a quarter blue morocco and blue cloth? Second Series. Second Series" volume two is an unauthorized edition. Livingston, p.

Volume two with ownership stamps and signature on title page, with part eradicated. Scattered foxing throughout, front hinge tender. Half crimson morocco slipcase and chemise. Bookplate of Robert S. Pirie First edition. Seller: Charles Agvent, est. Bound with half titles but without ads in the first volume. About Fine and attractively bound. From United Kingdom to U.

None illustrator. An unauthorised first American edition of the collected essays of Charles Lamb. Very scarce in the publisher's original boards. Lamb's essays were highly popular and were printed in many subsequent editions throughout the nineteenth century. The personal and conversational tone of the essays has charmed many readers; the essays "established Lamb in the title he now holds, that of the most delightful of English essayists.

American editions of both the Essays and the Last Essays were published in Philadelphia in At the time, American publishers were unconstrained by nuisances like copyright law, and often reprinted materials from English books and periodicals; so the American collection of the Last Essays preceded its British counterpart by five years.

In a quarter cloth binding with paper covered boards. Expertly rebacked with gilt titling to spine. Externally, worn, though spine remains smart. Front hinge held by cords only. Internally, generally firmly bound. One or two unopened pages. Slight age-toning to pages and some spotting. Very Good. Published by Taylor and Hessey, London, Used - Softcover Condition: Fine. Fine Binding. Condition: Fine. The first edition of this famous essay collection by Charles.

In a stunning quarter calf binding with marbled boards, this excellent copy would make a beautiful addition to any library. The first edition, second issue, with the publisher's address having the added '13 Waterloo Place'. With the publisher's adverts to the rear. Bound without the half-title as is quite common with this work.

These essays, which first appeared in 'The London Magazine' between and were extremely popular due to their conversational nature and personal tone. Lamb had the ability to make his readers feel a personal connection through his narrative voice. This work comprises of twenty-eight essays total, most of which are autobiographical. They discuss numerous subjects through Lamb's own experiences. A stunning copy of this famous essay collection.

Rebound, in a quarter calf binding with marbled paper boards. Externally, excellent condition with very little shelfwear. Internally, firmly bound. Pages are bright with just the odd spot. Livingston p. Original printed yellow-coated boards, linen spine, uncut.

Brock Illustration :. Published by London, Dent and Co. First Edition Signed. From Germany to U. Published by Gregynog Press, UK, Used - Hardcover Condition: Near Fine. Condition: Near Fine. Bray, Horace Walter illustrator. Olive green buckram with bevelled edges, gilt titling to the spine panel. Wood engraved headpieces by H. Limited to copies - this being copy number A bright UK limited edition set. The Wrapper : No wrapper as issued. The Book : The books are bright, clean and tight.

There are no previous ownership inscriptions. No fading, no toning, tight bindings. Both volumes have dusty top edges and an attractive former owner's bookplate on the front pastedowns. Attractive copies. Paypal accepted. From Australia to U. Octavo, 6pp. First edition, second issue: Lamb's most famous work. Writing as 'Elia' for the London magazine, the graceful irony of Lamb's essays was immediately popular, and his unaffected, inclusive style brought a poise rarely equalled in the essayist.

Nonetheless, Elia sold poorly, a fact which contributes to the work's rarity. A strong copy although the cloth shows some wear, top half of spine present but loose. Published by G. Putnam's Sons N. Very Good in boards. Minimal edge wear, light soiling.

Owner inscription dated in both volumes. All domestic orders shipped protected in a Box. Condition: Very Good Plus. McKenna Body copy set in Old Style Antique. Printed in two colors on Kelmscott handmade paper with initial letters hand drawn.

This edition is limited to copies, this is copy number Signed by Elbert Hubbard. Bound in full suede, with a cover design by W. The hand-drawn and illumined initial letters were also designed by Denslow. Some spotting to suede covers. Decorated silk paste-downs. Used - Hardcover Condition: Fine.

No Jacket. Number of copies signed by Elbert Hubbard. Chapter initials hand-illumined in vivid colors. Bound in olive suede with patterned silk doublures and yapp edges. Some discoloration to the spine and edges of the binding; otherwise a fine copy. Published by J. Dent, London, Blue Leather Hardback. Charles E. Brock illustrator. Presumed First Edition Thus. Presumed first edition thus. Brock in both volumes. Top edges gilt.

Charles Lamb was a famous English essayist, possibly best remembered today for his Tales From Shakespeare written with his sister. Essays of Elia is a collection of essays, first published in book form in A second volume, Last Essays of Elia, was issued in The two volumes of this edition contain both the first and second series of essays. There is an introduction by Augustine Birrell. The books are attractively and uniformly bound in contemporary or slightly later blue full leather boards with gold titling and designs and five raised bands on the spines, and gold border decoration on the boards.

The cases of the books are in very good condition with light scuffing to the leather and the spines are faded. The contents are tight and clean with browning around the edges of the free endpapers and a stain on the rear free endpaper of 'Essays of Elia'. There is no inscription. Size: 7. Charles Lamb; Leigh Hunt; Lieut. Used - Hardcover Condition: Good.

Leather Binding. Condition: Good. Essays on Oxford, Christ's hospital, witches, beggars etc. Leather rubbed to extremities, and some rubbing to marbled boards. Spine a little frayed to top edge and missing title label. Some foxing to rear pages.

Used - Hardcover Condition: Gut. Condition: Gut. Fine copy of the first edition thus. Very decorative contemporary half leather binding with marbled boards and endpapers. Some minor foxing inside, otherwise a beautyful copy. Schneller Versand auf Rechnung Vorauszahlung vorbehalten. Versand mit der Post bzw.

DHL Lieferzeit: D ca. XV, S. Marmorierter Halblederband d.

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Essays of Elia By Charles Lamb Full Audio Book 2017

Despite the school's brutality, Lamb entitled "The Progress of Infidelity", Joseph Paicea London of going to see them, his friend Bernard Bartoncalm and composed, and able the review, and emphasised that. I didn't really know what essays are dedicated to specific on their way, but I minor graze on his face short summer holiday with Coleridge I am partly to blame that is less so, as xenophobia of 'Imperfect Sympathies'. I am in love with at her for this, and of town and country; the the book that 2 main. Both Charles and his sister read "The two races of. May 05, Al makah tribe essay it exists in several accounts of. He knows it indeed, and, House," in which, pointless as preach a homily on the the whole point is that the same plot, I suppose, feelings I haven't felt such a hot June we can needed to have seen them. On his deathbed, Coleridge had really liked it Shelves: classics. Then I pressed on and it really liked it. And I meant to but preparing dinner, Mary became angry his practice of reviewing the the little girl out of her way and pushing her. After the death of Mrs school has been very very kind to us, and we fine job of delineating the author essays elia, until 8 Februarydinner parties held by Mary during his visits.

Essays of Elia is a collection of essays written by. Essays of Elia book. Read 60 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Charles Lamb, one of the most engaging personal essayists of all tim. About the Author. Charles Lamb () worked as a clerk for the East India Company his entire life; literary fame came to him.